Wednesday, February 22, 2012

things that grow

I don't tend to notice things that grow from the ground. Things that grow from people, I notice those. And if those things are miniature people, I like them very much. If they are cancerous, I hate them very much. But things-that-grow-from-the-ground and I share a polite indifference. When we lived in San Diego LD maintained a small collection of potted things that I accidentally (very accidentally and with great remorse) let die while he was on a work trip. He was seriously annoyed at me, and I really did feel bad. My excuse was that I had been working in the ICU and had had difficulty remembering to water myself (i.e. bathe) much less water something else. I was forgiven.

Despite this selective myopia, I can't stop marveling at all daffodils that seemed to have erupted from the ground in perfect synchrony. I didn't realize that daffodils were such a popular flower around here.  LD says this is likely because they are generally a hardy bulb that grows well in this climate. It is also interesting to note that daffodils are part of the narcissus family, a genus with an interesting linguistic heritage in our uber self-conscious little community.

Whatever the reason for their popularity and abundance, the daffodils' contribution to this perfectly clear, 70 degree day is much appreciated and I am happier for it. Spring is coming.

In preparation for the coming season, LD made two separate trips to his favorite store - ACE Hardware. He spent the weekend planting the first crop of veggies and flowers, which included brussel sprouts, globe artichoke, cauliflower, broccoli, celery, bok choy, spinach, dill, sweet peas, walla walla onions, red onions, and one beautiful Calla lily that we can see from our bedroom window.
And lucky for all of us, he has no upcoming travel plans. I don't think I ever wrote about the results of last year's efforts. In his inaugural year, LD's habaneros proved the most prolific of his planting endeavors, which also included tomatoes, potatoes, snap peas, artichoke, basil, flat leaf parsley, and watermelons. Because we couldn't keep up with the habanero production, LD pickled the majority of the flame-colored peppers, and we have spent the last year very slowly making our way through the large mason jar in the refrigerator. 
This year's veggie beds

Speaking of other things that grow, little Wow had his six-week visit yesterday and is weighing in at the 60% percentile. He weighs more than Munch did at eight weeks, and she had a three week head start on him (he was born 37w, 1d, she was born 40w, 2d). The MA measured his length while he was wiggling, and came up with a result that was 30-40% percentile. I texted the results to LD, who met us at the door when we got home, took Wow from me, and remeasured him immediately. For Wow's sake, we are all thankful that he remeasured at almost the 90% percentile.


As one might expect, LD's interest in things-that-grow is even greater in the two things-that-grew-from-me. Obsessive, even. When Munch's height started to drift into the 50-60% percentile (she had also started out around 90%), LD had a small emotional meltdown. He bemoaned the possibility that "she might be, like only 5'5, or something". When I pointed out that I am 5'5 and this is taller than the average American woman (hands on hips so as to convey annoyance), he started putting protein powder into everything she ate and lamenting the bad luck of having married into such an impoverished gene pool.

10 comments:

  1. My pediatrician says that Abigail is in the 50-ish% of everything (except head circumference -- she has a big noggin), every time we go, despite the fact that the curve clearly shows otherwise. Still, we get told she's tall daily at the park. Tell L that there are worse things than being 5'5", really. Love the posts!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know. I don't put too much stock in the percentile thing. I think its designed to make sure children with problems at either end of the spectrum are identified. I am not sure if it predicts anything about future height in otherwise normal children.

      Delete
  2. Well, standing at 5'2" I personally would love the extra three inches. On the other hand, my son at 6'7" would eagerly give up a few.

    Starting the first of February every year I start craning my head to find the daffodils and red buds. I need the reassurance that spring will eventually come.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Whoa. You have a son who is 6'7'? I am not going to tell my husband that, he has just recently given up hope that one of his children will play professional basketball due to my shrimpy genes. I don't want to encourage him.

      Delete
  3. You always have such witty things to say. Fun post! I'm jealous that you've already got green stuff in the dirt. Love that gorgeous Calla Lilly. The Daffodils sound great too. Wow looks great & strapping to me. :-)

    ReplyDelete
  4. You're planting vegetable gardens in FEBRUARY? Yeesh...here planting them in early May is a sign of extreme optimism. I wish I lived in a warmer location...except without the crazy American politicians.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I will send you some beautiful California weather, but in exchange you have to take Rick Santorum. Deal?

      Delete
    2. Um, no. No amount of good weather could make up for that man.

      Delete
  5. That baby is precious, and his head looks just fine to me! Gosh, your dirt looks nice and black. We've gotta buy some to get it to look that way where I live.

    ReplyDelete

I don't publish comments that include my name, my husband's name, or the names of our children. House Rule. OR COMMENTS THAT LOOK LIKE SPAM. This means YOU, pregnancymiracle and YOU discountviagra.